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450 Franklin Street, Rocky Mount VA 24151 - 540-484-8277

Drive-By Truckers (standup show - limited seating)

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Drive-By Truckers (standup show - limited seating)
Tuesday, September 17, 2019 8:00 PM
Harvester Performance Center, Rocky Mount, VA
Admission Type Price Quantity

General Admission (standup show - limited seating)

$37.00
ALL SALES ARE FINAL
Show Details
  • When: Tuesday, Sep 17, 2019 8:00 PM (Doors open at 7:00 PM)
  • Ticket Price: $37.00 - $42.00
  • Door Time: 7:00 PM
  • Show Type: Americana
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General Admission (standing show) - $37 (plus fees)
Day of Show General Admission (if available) (standing) - $42 (plus fees)


Drive-By Truckers have always been outspoken, telling a distinctly American story via craft, character, and concept, all backed by sonic ambition and social conscience. Founded in 1996 by singer/songwriter/guitarists Mike Cooley and Patterson Hood, the band have long held a progressive fire in their belly but with AMERICAN BAND, they have made the most explicitly political album in their extraordinary canon. A powerful and legitimately provocative work, hard edged and finely honed, the album is the sound of a truly American Band – a Southern American band – speaking on matters that matter. DBT made the choice to direct the Way We Live Now head on, employing realism rather than subtext or symbolism to purge its makers’ own anger, discontent, and frustration with societal disintegration and the urban/rural divide that has partitioned the country for close to a half-century. Master songwriters both, Hood and Cooley wisely avoid overt polemics to explore such pressing issues as race, income inequality, the NRA, deregulation, police brutality, Islamophobia, and the plague of suicides and opioid abuse. As a result, songs like "What It Means" and the tub-thumping "Kinky Hypocrites" are intensely human music from a rock ‘n’ roll band yearning for community and collective action. Fueled by a just spirit of moral indignation and righteous rage, AMERICAN BAND is protest music fit for the stadiums, designed to raise issues and ire as the nation careens towards its most momentous election in a generation.
"I don’t want there to be any doubt as to which side of this discussion we fall on," Hood says. "I don’t want there to be any misunderstanding of where we stand. If you don’t like it, you can leave. It’s okay. We’re not trying to be everybody’s favorite band, we’re going to be who we are and do what we do and anyone who’s with us, we’d love to have them join in."
Mike Cooley is somewhat more direct. "I wanted this to be a no bones about it, in your face political album," he says. "I wanted to piss off the assholes."
AMERICAN BAND’s considerable force can in part be credited to the sheer musical strength of the current Drive-By Truckers line-up, with Hood and Cooley joined by bassist Matt Patton, keyboardist/multi-instrumentalist Jay Gonzalez, and drummer Brad Morgan – together, the longest-lasting iteration in the band’s two-decade history. AMERICAN BAND follows ENGLISH OCEANS and 2015’s IT’S GREAT TO BE ALIVE!, marking the first time DBT have made three consecutive LPs with the same hard-traveling crew.
"This is the longest period of stability in our band’s history," says Hood. "I think we finally hit the magic formula. It’s made everything more fun than it’s ever been, making records and playing shows."
Drive-By Truckers might have maintained constancy but Hood embraced change by moving his family to Portland, OR in July 2015, a physical shift which he says "opened the floodgates" to a batch of deeply felt, strikingly emotional new songs. Having recorded the bulk of their canon in Athens, GA, the band was also eager to reinvent their own surroundings. Memphis was considered but when DBT’s November 2015 tour wrapped in Nashville, the band decided to spend a few days at the legendary Sound Emporium getting a head start on the new record.
Never ones to screw around in the studio, DBT cranked out nine new songs in just three 14-hour shifts, as ever with producer/engineer David Barbe at the helm. Coming in directly from the road put a head of steam behind the band, allowing them to lay it all out live on the floor, tracking songs like "Once They Banned Imagine" in little more than a single take.
"We realized we had most of the record," Hood says, "so we went back after the holidays for four more days, but ended up finishing it in three. We tend to usually take about two weeks to make a record so this was really quick."
"That was a lot of fun," the Alabama-based Cooley says, "and a shorter drive for me."
Speed was of the essence, as DBT was determined to get their record out at the height of the 2016 election season. By their very nature, Drive-By Truckers has always been an inherently political act, "but this is the first time it’s been out there on the surface," Cooley says, "No bones about it."
"I’ve always considered our band to be political," Hood says. "I’ve studied and followed politics since I was a small kid. I got in trouble in third grade for a paper I wrote about Watergate – the teacher sent a note home to my parents saying I was voicing opinions about our president that she didn’t appreciate. That’s the one time I got in trouble at school where my parents sided with me."

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS SOCIALS:
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/DriveByTruckers

Jimbo Mathus

No one back home in Mississippi was really that surprised when, one night, they saw Jimbo appear in a monkey mask on national television. Friends and family weren’t shocked to see him leaping like a madman possessed, throwing $100 bills at David Letterman on Late Night. This was in 1998, the dregs of the 20th century. Jimbo was performing with his bizarre brainchild, Squirrel Nut Zippers who, quite accidentally, became America’s darlings and were riding high on a runaway hit single “Hell”.

No, they had noticed something odd about Jimbo early on. “He could do things other children couldn’t do,” says a close family friend. “He seemed always focused on some distant horizon, obsessed over a private thought no one else could fathom.”

He was haunted by ghosts from the nearby civil war battlefield… the bloodbath that was Shiloh. “I was fascinated by ancient things and the arcane,” Mathus , 47, states. “I saw visions… I could see and feel the Earth plummeting through the solar system and it, in turn grinding along, clock-like. I saw and heard time being sucked into the gaping maw of infinity. It’s taken me all these years to even figure out what it all meant. I always felt both frightened and comforted by these childhood episodes. The next thing I remember I woke up… and there was music!”